How a Resume Writer Writes the Best Resumes

So you think it costs too much to hire a professional resume writer? After all, why should you pay a few hundred dollars for a quick typing job that you could do you yourself, right? If this is your belief, then I beg to differResume3a with you. Let me show you why.

Anyone who has written his or her own resume will tell you that the process takes hours to produce a document that will get you a job interview.No, it is NOT a typing job – that's the easiest part. Preceding the typing is the assembly of your employment, education, and other resume data; organizing it; selecting impactful action words and phrases to articulate it; choosing which accomplishments merit bulleted statements; designing the format and style (oh, you're just going to use a Word template? Hmm..); rewriting it to fit into two or three pages (depending on certain factors); and so much more.

I'm sure you've heard that tons of people are searching for jobs these days. Without attention to the necessary details, your resume won't pass the 10-second glance the time a recruiter or HR person takes to look at your resume to see if it deserves further scrutiny. What does your resume say – and how is it said – to draw in the reader? Will your resume get picked to go to the second round? Mind you, we're not talking about job interview here, only resume screening.

Here's how a professional resume writer approaches the resume writing process after you hire him/her:

1) Gathering the resume data

Whether the resume writer provides you a questionnaire to complete, interviews you verbally, or does a combination of both, the goal is to extract so much information about your career and education that there is much more data than could possibly be included in a resume. What's the purpose? A resume writer needs to know your job target and the supporting background you have to document it. A resume writer uses an objective eye to tie your experience to your niche goal and needs a deep pool of facts from which to choose to make this happen.

2) Choosing the appropriate style and format

Your resume must make you stand out from the crowd if you have any hope of getting it read. In years past, colored stationery helped do this. In our electronic age of today, format and style must be appropriate for your target, experience level, and field. I can hear people asking, "What role do format and style play when pasting a resume into an on-line application box?" Yes, you lose your formatting (which makes conversion to simple text mandatory), but style also means how your resume writing flows. You won't lose your format and style when applying with a resume attached to an email. And don't forget that a professionally formatted and styled resume (printed on watermarked stationery) will earn you bonus points when you take it to an in-person job interview.

3) Creating the resume from scratch

With a desktop full of resume questionnaire, potential job postings (where scannable keywords are found), dictionary and thesaurus, a professional resume writer starts crafting your document with a blank computer screen. Wait a minute – is that acronym supposed to be capitalized? God bless Google and Wikipedia! Recording job titles and dates, colleges and degrees, professional affiliations and community activities – all are done before any actual technical writing begins. After studying employment history, next comes the crafting of content using vivid action words that create winning perceptions in a reader's mind. Responsibilities go into a brief paragraph under a job title, while quantifiable accomplishments and results stand out as bulleted statements underneath.

4) Proofread, rewrite, and repeat process

Tweaking is a professional resume writer's passion for perfection. Yes, every resume must be perfect – there's never a valid excuse for not being so. And don't put all your faith into spell-check. (There's a big difference between "Public Administrator" and "Pubic Administrator" – but spell-check can't think for you.) Usually, 24 hours away from a project brings a fresh approach to wording, spacing, and correct grammar. As a rule, no resume leaves a writer's desktop until it is perfect in every way. However, professional resume writers want their work to reflect your personality, so draft reviews and more rewriting are common before any resume writing project is closed.

So, there you have it – this is why professional resume writers earn the "big bucks!" Just kidding – if you break down all that a writer does for one project, you'll find many man- (or woman-) hours involved. No, resume writing is not just a typing exercise, but so much more. When you partner with a professional resume writer, you really do get a resume that will get you job interviews! Still not convinced? Then go to the library and pick up one or two of these Ten Top Resume Writing Books. Take a big bag to carry them home – most of these tomes are packed with details and sit on my book shelf as reference books. Hey, you may even find my resume samples as contributions in some of them.

Wishing you career success in 2012!


Five Key Resume Writing Fallacies Revealed

OK, let's face this issue head on – professional resumes written by trained, credentialed, professional resume writers do NOT cost $50. Overwhelm There, I've said it – not so hard to do. If you want a well-crafted, marketing tool to help you get a job interview, you'll need to invest time, energy AND dollars into the professional resume writing process. That's the only way to develop the most important document you need to have to conduct a successful job search.

1. Resumes should only cost around $50 – NOT. (See above.) Get over the resume sticker shock. If you get a good job, what percentage of your first year's income would be your investment? One percent or less? Now, isn't it worth it to invest that much in a professional resume? Added bonus: wouldn't it be a relief to not have to stress out over drafting your resume all by yourself?

2. Resume writing is just a typing exercise – NOT. C'mon, do you really want to use a template you found on a computer to create the most important document used in your job search? To compete as part of today's saturated candidate pool, you must stand out! Your resume has to make your case for you, or you'll never get a job interview.

3. Resumes are easy to create for yourself – NOT. Even a resume writer struggles to create one for himself/herself. It's much too difficult to be objective about your own career experience and accomplishments. You need an unbiased eye to dig out what's most important to include in your resume based upon your current target market. Remember, the best resume is the one that's most narrowly niched. Employers never want to hunt for the reason why you submitted your resume to them. Actually, they WON'T do that – they'll throw away any resume that's too general and you'll never find out why.

4. Resume writing is just recording your work history – NOT. Resume writing is a form of technical writing – not reporting, essay, or poetry. It is a skill, craft, talent that is finely honed with frequent practice – after the "rules" are learned. Your "story" must be told in reverse chronological order, painting the picture of how you want to be perceived today in the world of work. It must include examples, accomplishments, and results that demonstrate your value, your problem-solving ability, and why you should be hired above anyone else. Your resume represents your career brand.

5. Resumes should be written by the job candidates themselves – NOT. This is a fallacy perpetuated by human resources. (Please – no fair throwing darts at me for this remark, HR, but your comments are welcome below.) Usually, how successful is a defendant who doesn't hire an attorney but represents himself/herself in court? Do you try to extract your own tooth to save money by not going to the dentist? How about diagnosing your own illness by researching on the internet instead of going to the doctor – how does that work for you? You are probably very good at what you do for a living and have a lot experience with talent to back up your actions. So, if you aren't good at writing your own resume – what's the big deal? Hire the best professional resume writer to partner with you on the project and I know you'll be happy with the resulting product.

I'm fully aware that my opinions expressed in this post may ruffle some feathers. However, based on 12 years of owning my boutique career services firm, I know this information to be true. Most of my clients are walking testimonials to the credibility of my remarks here. If you don't hire a professional resume writer to craft your career marketing materials, I wish you all the best and hope you prove me wrong. Tell me about your success (or not) in the comments section below. I want to hear it all!

Wishing you career success in 2011!


Layoff Heading Your Way? 7 Things to Do Now!

We all know that today's workplace is like a ship on a turbulent sea: Ship You never know when you might get thrown overboard – or at least injured. So, be prepared for whatever happens. Take precautions so you won't be caught off guard.

Following are some basic tips to brace yourself for a layoff. Heed them, or ignore them at your peril:

1. Move all of your personal files off of your office computer – get them home! Now! And this includes your resume. Sometimes layoffs happen so quickly that you aren't allowed to take personal possessions with you, let alone remove anything off the work computer.

2. Time to update your resume – don't wait until you're already out of work. Hire a professional resume writer to help as you may not be thinking too clearly right now. You need an objective point of view to dig out your key accomplishments and results. Your resume is your marketing brochure to get to the next job search step – the job interview, your personal sales presentation.

3. Update your LinkedIn profile with current job information, as well as new connections. Connect with current co-workers, vendors, professionals in your field, and anyone you know who could help you build a bridge to your next job. Get involved on LinkedIn to build your find-ability. Join industry-related and general local groups where you will pose questions and respond to others as part of the networking process. (Did you know that LinkedIn is the number one place that recruiters go to source talent?)

4. Tell everyone you know in your personal life that your job is ending. This is nothing to be ashamed of! You need the far reach of all your contacts to help you connect with your next opportunity. I had one career coaching client land his next job by networking with other parents at his son's soccer game. Shame is your enemy – own your situation and share the news.

5. Hire a Career Coach to help you develop your job search strategy. Get one-on-one support from a careers professional focused on your special situation – shift your career into full gear! Otherwise, you may fall victim to circular thinking and remain unemployed much longer. Support is critical to your success. This is not the time to believe you can do this alone – you need help! And that's OK!

6. Use whatever time you have left at work to take advantage of your health insurance benefits: schedule and do annual physicals, dental visits, take care of your vision needs, refill prescriptions, etc. COBRA is expensive. Other health insurance can be cost prohibitive when you have to purchase it yourself. Going without health insurance can be very risky, so you'll have to get some coverage, though it probably won't be the Cadillac version you've had through work.

7. Analyze your budget and determine exactly how much money you need to survive for at least 3 to 6 months, maybe longer. Axe the cable TV, daily lattes, eating out, gifts, manicures, and whatever else you don't need to survive (start washing the car in your driveway!). Learn to cook – it's so much cheaper than eating out, and healthier, too!

I'm sure I've missed other important tasks for layoff preparation. For those of you who've experienced this life-altering event, what should be added to this list? Please share to help those who are next up to walk the plank. Career churn is the new norm. We really need to help each other. Always keep your life jacket nearby!

I welcome your comments and contributions.

Wishing you career success in 2011!