Need a New Career – Why Can’t I Just Figure It Out?

Such a frustrating feeling to get stuck on the career change treadmill, the one where you know you're not happy with work, but go in unending circles every time you try to come up with new ideas. Sound familiar? It's OK to admit it – many people are doing the same these days. They want to find something new and different, where the work hours may be fewer and the job satisfaction is greater.

As a Career Coach, I get lots of calls from individuals wanting my help to "just figure it all out." Some Turnlifearound_19 have tried assessments, research, and long hours of conversations with friends – all without results. They call me as a last resort thinking that maybe they'll have to invest in some professional assistance. There's no shame in that. It took me three years and two job moves to make a career transition from my 12-year career in college financial aid administration to working in the careers field. If I'd known about career coaches then, I wouldn't have spent three years spinning my wheels. You shouldn't either.

Do you "avoid any strategy that is not logical and almost certain of desired outcome?" (From the program quiz, "Now What? 90 Days to a New Life Direction." Take the free quiz to see where you fit.) If you do, this is your biggest mistake. The first step to changing careers is to play in your right brain for awhile; that's where the creativity will get sparked. You must give yourself permission to take a time-out from logic. Breathe, relax, and let your mind wander. Get involved in a fun activity where you surrender all thought of your career. You'll be surprised that after a day or so, new ideas will rush into your brain. But stop! It's not yet time to act on anything. New ideas need to percolate. Just let them exist for awhile as you go about your current job.

When ready to explore your ideas, do just that – explore. Research possibilities and talk to people who actually work in these jobs. Cast a wide net while keeping all the "yeah, buts" at bay. Now is not the time to let logic restrict you! There will come the time when any final career idea you choose must be filtered through business reality – but not yet! Restrictions at this time will only drag down your creative juices. Sometimes the "right" career idea comes from a sprout of the original idea, so just go with the flow for awhile. Don't rush the process!

There's a lot of information on the Internet and in publications on how to change careers, most stemming from logical processes – assessments, research, reading, etc. While this may work for some, I know my career coaching clients are forever grateful after experiencing the three-month, innovative, right brain approach.

Wishing you career success in 2012!


Job Dissatisfaction Running Rampant: Are You Running With It?

How unhappy we are at work these days! Job satisfaction is at an all-time low, yet most workers are afraid to even contemplate making a career change. Fear rules most career decisions.

For the past couple of days I've been blogging about career change – how people want it, but many are afraid to take the leap, especially in today's uncertain economy. Everyone needs a paycheck, and most are willing to do anything to keep one coming in. Yesterday the Herman Group published their weekly alert quoting a respected source about employee job dissatisfaction:

"The Conference Board research group recently reported job satisfaction has fallen to a record low of 45 percent, the lowest level ever recorded in 22 years of surveys! Extrapolating from that number, more than half (55 percent) of US workers state that they are "dissatisfied" with their jobs. It is also logical that the most dissatisfied group is workers under the age of 25—64 percent of whom said they are unhappy in their jobs." (Read the full report from the Herman Group – Herman Trend Alert, 1-13-10)

It's so much easier for people to identify what they don't like, than to bravely venture out into the unknown to identify what they do like. Fear is a powerful emotion that will cripple your creativity – creativity that's essential for new career directions to be discovered, let alone be acted upon.

Don't get stuck in one place like the proverbial deer in the headlights. Take the first step to evaluate what your values, skills, and interests are that you'd like to transfer to a new career direction. You don't have to hurry the process, but do go beyond the fear to find your next career path to job satisfaction. You deserve to be happy! And believe it or not, that option does exist – even today.